Sault Lawyer Joins Ontario Bar Association as Policy and Professional Development Lawyer

Maija Laitinen has worked at the Human Rights Legal Support Centre, the Crown Attorney’s Office and most recently at the Algoma Community Legal Clinic.

the Ontario Bar Association announced that Maija Laitinen, of Sault Ste. Marie, will take up a position as a policy and professional development lawyer within the organization.

The role will involve creating development programs, communicating with members about policy changes and updates, and advocating for the association.

For more information, please see the press release below.

The Ontario Bar Association is pleased to announce that Maija Laitinen, of Sault Ste. Marie, joined the organization as a policy and professional development lawyer.

Ms. Laitinen has worked at the Human Rights Legal Support Centre, the Crown Attorney’s Office and most recently at the Algoma Community Legal Clinic. She brings a level of knowledge and experience that will give legal professionals the tools they need to thrive in a rapidly modernizing world of law, while ensuring that Ontarians have access to the justice they deserve.

Operating out of Sault Ste. Marie, she will work with attorneys and OBA staff to develop timely and insightful professional development programs, while playing a key role in advocacy and policy development for the association. Working closely with OBA members and other members of the legal profession, Ms. Laitinen will help identify important issues, liaise with policymakers, and communicate legislative and policy changes and updates to members. .

“Throughout the challenges of the past two years, the OBA has been there with innovative ideas, advocacy, services and solutions that help move the profession and the justice system forward,” said the president of the OBA. ‘ABO, Karen Perron, whose presidential term is focused on building on the connections that members across the province already have, while helping them operate effectively and achieve greater satisfaction. “Maija will play a key role in how we develop this to help lawyers – including those in the South West region of the province – grow their practices, while having better access to the tools and services they need. need to become more modern, productive and accessible.

“As with everything the OBA does, regional differences are highly relevant to the tools and services we continue to offer lawyers, but entirely irrelevant to their ability to access them.”

About the Ontario Bar Association

Founded in 1907, the OBA is the largest voluntary legal association in Ontario, representing more than 16,000 lawyers, judges, law professors and law students. The OBA provides continuing professional development and advocates improvements to the law for the benefit of the profession and the public.

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